Rustic Roasted Potato, Broccoli and Corn Chowda!

I could eat this every day.

I could eat this every day.

While our neighbors to the north are digging through snow, we’ve had warmer temps and rain, rain and more rain down here in the South. Not that I’m complaining because it’s so good for the garden. However, there’s enough of a chill in the air to make you want something warming and comforting for dinner…wintery comfort food, in other words.

Not much to harvest in the broccoli and chives category, but still nice to have something from the garden this time of year.

Not much to harvest in the broccoli and chives category, but still nice to have something from the garden this time of year.

The broccoli harvest from my little winter garden was almost laughable, it was so small. There are still some babies on the stalks so I may see more before it’s all said and done, but for the time being…about 3 or 4 bites worth! I wanted to combo it with something where we both could enjoy its flavor, even if there wasn’t enough for a side dish, and that’s how I came up with this lovely chowder. It’s rich without being too heavy, and you can easily omit the bacon for a vegetarian option, if you want or need to do so. You just can’t go wrong with anything that combines roasted potatoes, broccoli, sweet corn, onions, and a creamy base topped with a little sprinkle of bacon for good measure. You just can’t!

Happy Valentine’s Day!

Roasting adds much depth to the flavor of the chowder.

Roasting the potatoes and broccoli adds a ton of depth and flavor to this chowder. Leaving the skins on the potatoes adds a rustic touch!

Rustic Roasted Potato, Broccoli and Corn Chowder
Serves 6

1 lb. red skinned potatoes, washed, scrubbed and cut into bite sized pieces, skin on
1 lb. Yukon gold potatoes, washed, scrubbed and cut into bite sized pieces, skin on
2 cups broccoli florets (I just used my smaller amount, but 2 cups is better!)
1 Tablespoon olive oil + 1 teaspoon
Kosher salt and freshly black ground pepper to taste
3 Tablespoons fresh thyme leaves, divided
1 large sweet onion, chopped (1 1/2 cups)
2 Tablespoons unsalted butter
2 Tablespoons flour
4 cups 1% milk
1/2 cup cream
1 1/2 cups low sodium chicken stock, preferably homemade
2 cups frozen corn kernels
1 Tablespoon fresh chives, minced
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 1/2 teaspoons kosher salt
A few grinds of black pepper
(Optional)Β Garnish ofΒ 3 slices of applewood smoked bacon, cooked until crisp, drained and set aside

Cover a cookie sheet in foil and grease it with a little olive oil. Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Place the cut potatoes on the foil and toss them with the 1 tablespoon of olive oil, some kosher salt and pepper and 1 tablespoon of the thyme. Roast them in the oven for about 15 minutes, then give them a stir, then roast them for about 8 more minutes, or until the potatoes are starting to become tender when pricked with a fork and beginning to brown. Toss the broccoli florets in 1 teaspoon of oil and add them to the potatoes, then roast another 6-8 minutes. Remove from the oven and set aside.

While the potatoes and broccoli are roasting, melt the butter in the bottom of a dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until it’s translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the flour to the butter and onion and cook the flour, stirring constantly, for about a minute or two, then add the milk slowly, stirring, then the cream, chicken stock and corn. Add the roasted potatoes and broccoli to the pot, then the chives, remaining thyme, cayenne pepper and salt, and bring to a simmer. Allow the chowder to cook for about 10 minutes, stirring occasionally. Taste for seasoning, adding a few grinds of black pepper. Serve hot in bowls and crumble 1/2 slice of bacon on top of each serving, if desired.

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46 thoughts on “Rustic Roasted Potato, Broccoli and Corn Chowda!

  1. I could eat this soup everyday too Betsy! I can see how the cold rain would make you crave comforting dishes like this one. I would have welcomed this soup with open arms after the hours of shovelling we spent last week. You are so lucky that you didn’t have to dig out with the rest of us in the north! Happy Valentine’s day to you and yours!

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    • The shovelling is definitely the down side of all that snow, unless you lose power, too. So sorry I couldn’t have had some of this warm soup waiting for you when you came in from the cold, Barb! Happy Valentine’s Day to you and yours, too! πŸ™‚

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  2. Corn chowder is such a wonderful soup, Betsy, and yours is a real gem. Using roasted vegetables would add all kinds of great flavor to it and adding the broccoli would surprise most dinner guests. I like that! And yes, your broccoli harvest may have been a little less than expected but, compared to what’s growing around here, it’s miraculous! πŸ™‚

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    • It’s definitely a nice surprise to have anything from the garden this time of year…even here…so I’m thankful for my little harvests! I’m glad you like my chowder, John. I don’t know why I don’t make it more often, but the broccoli added to it and the roasting made a dynamite soup. Happy Valentine’s Day!

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  3. Corn Chowda… sounds amazing and I like how you left it in larger identifiable peices. When you have picky teenagers, they must be able to pick out the green things… So how is your hand doing? Are you on recovery? Take care, BAM

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  4. What a perfect soup for our cold weather. I’m always jealous of your warmer temperatures to be able to grow veg in the winter, so cool, or hot. I always roast vegetables for the soup, I just adore the sweetness roasting brings out. The garnish of crispy bacon looks wonderful. Happy Valentine’s Day Betsy, hope your partner spoils you!

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    • Thank you, Eva. I wish I could send some warm weather your way. The only down side to it is that the critters never die off, so something is eating what’s left of my garden at the point. But I did get some harvest, so can’t complain! Rest assured, I am and will be spoiled today, and I hope you will be, too! Happy Valentine’s Day!

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  5. I think I could eat this every day too. What a great looking bowl of comfort. Sorry to hear about all the rain, rain and more rain. I know we need rain for the garden but rain is very dreary xx

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  6. Love (love) corn chowder Betsy. You’ve got a really delicious mix going on there (though I don’t eat the meat part, I could add a touch of liquid smoke and … well, I’d be fooled anyway.) πŸ™‚ This is the sort of dish that chases winter all the way to next year!

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    • Hi Spree! I’m so glad you like this. You don’t need the smoke or the bacon in this chowder. It’s lovely and flavorful without (we’ve eaten it both ways) because of roasting the veggies. They give you that extra depth.

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  7. That’s a bowl of comfort right there Betsy. We had some sun today but it seems to have been freezing temperatures and solid rain for the past few days. This would be the perfect thing to warm one up after a day out in the cold. Love the little green garnish on top – such a lovely colour contrast!

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    • Thank you, Charles. Sounds like this would be really good to make for your current weather conditions! Of course a bit of bacon on top never hurts anything, but this is equally good without it and you can garnish with a sprig of thyme…just not quite as colorful and contrasty. So glad you like it! Happy Weekend.

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  8. that bowl is screaming out to me right now. ah, I could eat that everyday too. can;t beat a warm bowl of chunky chowder with your own broccoli. perfect for a cold february day! (or night)

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    • I’m so glad you like it, Shu han. I was sad when we scooped up the last drop and will surely be making this again during the winter days to come. πŸ™‚ Although I don’t think I’ll be making it with my own broccoli, sadly.

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  9. Hi Betsy, Small is beautiful! And your broccoli crop may be small but I bet it was tasty. Leave the plants in th eground and you may get some more shoots from the side of the main stem.
    Tasty winter wamer, and I LOVE chowder πŸ™‚

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    • Hi Claire! I did leave the plants as they had shoots already around the side of the stem, and I trimmed what you see here just above those shoots, hoping for more. Thanks for your tips and Norma gave me some that were helpful as well, since this is my first broccoli. So glad you like my chowder. It was really tasty and I want to make more…like I said, I could eat it every day! πŸ™‚

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  10. Pingback: Part Three: Chilis, Chowders and Some Extra Ideas for Enjoying Them. | bits and breadcrumbs

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